All posts tagged: early labour

Labour & Birth: An Overview

When we think about the process of childbirth, what our body needs to do is pretty simple: Labour is triggered by our baby and our body responds by creating contractions which move baby into the pelvis and which causes the muscles of the uterus to do its thing – the long muscles shorten, causing the cervix to dilate and then contractions become expulsive, guiding baby down through the birth canal. It can certainly be as simple as this but labour and birth is also a fine balance of hormones which can help make contractions effective and manageable. And while every labouring woman will have her own pattern of labour, there can be familiar characteristics. What is happening…Your cervix is softening, thinning and opening – this can take a few hours or a few days and your contractions may vary from being completely mild and manageable to more uncomfortable and painful. Your baby can also be settling into position in your pelvis. What it can feel like…It is normal to feel excited, worried, apprehensive, relieved, anxious, …

early labour newcastle and tyneside

Early Labour

I am a long early-labourer – with two of my babies I niggled and contracted for days before labour finally kicked in. With my first it was for ‘just’ a day – it was exhausting, sometimes frightening and I felt like I was in this off no-mans land because I wasn’t officially in labour and so it was just me and my husband and my trusty Sheila Kitzinger book. Nothing much is written about early labour – and in pregnancy we might not seek this information because we mainly want to know about full-on labour and managing those big contractions. But it can be early labour that throws us the curve ball, that knocks our confidence and takes us by surprise by being hard to manage. Early labour can be brief and manageable but it can also last for 2-3 days with discomfort, pain, tiredness, frustration and that’s before labour properly kicks in. It can often be caused by the position of a baby in the womb – lying on the right, lying back-to-back or just not quite lined …