All posts filed under: practitioner comment

Why I coslept…

When I attended antenatal classes during my first pregnancy I scoffed at the idea of sharing a bed with my baby, of choosing to co-sleep – in my world a baby belonged in one of those Moses Basket things, on its own to sleep until it needed feeding or when I would have to pace the floor to get it to sleep again. My baby was born at home at lunchtime and by the time we had finished with a hospital trip for stitches, tidied up and called family it was time for bed – and my baby was not leaving my arms, which posed a bit of a problem for me because I couldn’t fit in the Moses Basket with her! So we chose to co-sleep. For me, she was too vulnerable in her basket on her own and all my instincts screamed to keep her close and that is what she needed, that is where she settled. But I kept fighting it – in my head I needed a baby who settled and slept …

A broken maternity system and what that means for expectant parents…

A recent article in All4Maternity, entitled I Am A Midwife And I Am Broken, states: “On the shifts when I’ve not been alone I’ve been moved to work from one area to another, over and over. How many times can I apologise to women for leaving them as soon as I’ve helped to bring their baby into the world as I’ve been pulled to look after the somebody else? How can I provide continuity of care and build up a rapport with women and their families when this keeps happening? How can they trust me when I have to keep letting them down so often? How can I keep letting the student midwife that I’m mentoring down? How can I not have time to teach them as I want to and make sure they completely understand what they need to without compromising patient care? I’ve worked in the hospital and community settings and neither is better than the other at the moment, there is a break in the system and we can’t patch it… …Midwives …

birth newcastle tyneside

Birth Assertiveness

When I talk to women about birth the stories are varied but there can be some very common themes and terms such as ‘wasn’t allowed’ can feature very strongly. Women can sometimes feel restricted but birth assertiveness is important to say what you need, to ask questions and to gather more information. I am passionate about women being able to move in labour, to get into positions to aid labour and to be more comfortable – being off the bed and able to rock, sway, sit, stand, lean and wander as you need to means that you can feel that you have more control, helping you to work with your contractions rather than battle with them, it means you can rest and conserve energy, it means you can be guided by your body to give your baby the space he needs do get into a better position and to ease his manoeuvre through the pelvis and down the birth canal. Keeping a labouring women on a bed when she doesn’t feel comfortable there can mean she ends up feeling like a patient, to be told …