All posts filed under: Birth, Baby & Family

A unique range courses and support for expectant and new parents across Tyneside

what’s the point of antenatal classes…

I work with a lot of parents – antenatally as well as postnatally – so there is always a lot of discussion around birth and preparation for it. A common themes is the assumption that all antenatal classes are the same – they’re not. There can be a lot of well-meaning antenatal classes out there but that doesn’t mean it’s effective birth preparation. Good antenatal classes can make a huge difference to confidence which means that expectant parents can have more understanding of the process, a greater belief in their ability and the confidence to ask questions, to put themselves at the centre of their care – this is so important because maternity units can be busy and even the most brilliant of midwives are juggling. Labour can be straight-forward, or it can be tough going – I am passionate about preparing you as best I can for the changes that can happen so you feel better able to go with it, to stay calm and to keep gathering the information. My antenatal classes focus …

Schedule of Sessions

I work with parents during pregnancy, for birth preparation and during the early weeks & months as parents with a new baby. I provide a combination of small group and 1:1 sessions… Monday1:1 Appointments: 10am & 4pmBaby Massage: 1pmAntenatal Course: 7pm WednesdayMotherCuppa: 1pm1:1 Appointments: 10am, 4pm & 7pm ThursdaySleepy Mother Cuppa / 4th Trimester MotherCuppa: 1pmWeaning Workshop: 1pm1:1 Appointments: 10am, 4pm & 7pm Friday1:1 Appointments: 10am, 4pm & 7pmBaby Massage: 1pm Saturday1:1 Appointments: 10am & 1pm I have worked with parents since 2002 and, as a practitioner with professional training and experience, I am trusted to provide a balance of reliable knowledge, non-judgemental support and much needed reassurance. My approach is not about telling you what to do – it is to listen, to provide you with the opportunity to ask questions, it is about providing ideas and information, helping you to formulate plans and to find what works for you and for your family. The focus is on your wellbeing in pregnancy, for birth, as a parent and as you, the person behind the …

The Pregnancy, Birth & New Baby Guide

This guide is packed full of information, ideas and tips for you during pregnancy, for birth and as you adjust to life with your new baby. They have been written to be useful for all expectant and new parents but, as I am based in Tyneside, there is also a local slant for support and services. These pages will go live in January… Please do share this to anyone who is pregnant or who has a new baby and if you have any queries, please don’t hesitate to send me a message…

why women stop breastfeeding

The UK has the lowest rate of breastfeeding in the world – only 1 in 200 women breastfeed their children after they reach their first birthday. Statistics show that 80% of women start breastfeeding at birth but half of those babies have formula by the end of the first week. Breastfeeding author Dr Amy Brown surveyed women who had stopped feeding, she found that 80% of the women who stopped in the first 6 weeks didn’t want to stop but felt that they couldn’t continue. Brown states that the vast majority of women who stop feeding do so due to their experience rather than an inability to feed. As a practitioner who works with postnatal women a lot of my work is about reassurance and normalising feeding, sleep, growth spurts and meeting the changing needs of a baby. I my day-to-day work I see a couple of reasons for stopping breastfeeding… 1. Our culture still sets mothers up to fail with expectations of routines, babies who sleep through the night, babies who settle themselves and …

Breastfeeding Challenges

In addition to learning how to breastfeed there can be some other factors which can impact how ‘easy’ breastfeeding is and how confident how might feel about feeding your baby. Growth spurtsThese generally take place between 7- 10 days, between 2-3 weeks, between 4-6 weeks, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months and 9 months.Spurts can last a few days but for some babies it is more likely to be a week or more especially at 4 months and 9 months when there is a big developmental leap. It can be easier to meet your babies needs and go with what they need. Your baby may feel all over the place and could need more food, as well reassurance/safety as their brain develops and their world is changing. Your baby could be more cuddly, could wake more and may just need to cling to you. How might you feel? Tired and frustrated and feeling like you are dong something wrong – you’re not! Chances are you could also be feeling hungry and thirsty – make sure …